Wilks Calculator: Wilks Score Calculator in Lbs And Kgs – Fitness Volt

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Our Wilks Score Calculator is for accurate calculation of Wilks points, Find out your strength level in seconds.

Wilks Score Calculator

Unit System: Lbs Kgs
Gender: Male Female
Your Body Weight:
Weight Lifted:

The Wilks formula (or coefficient) is used to compare the weight lifted in powerlifting between lifters of varying body weights and also gender. So you can compare the strength of men and women as well as lifts based on bodyweight between individuals.

Basically, it’s a pound-for-pound comparison here.

Scores are calculated by comparing a weight lifted to that of numbers achieved by other lifters at the same bodyweight.

And the very complex formula (which you can see below) is based on research and a coefficient devised by Robert Wilks, CEO of Powerlifting Australia.

Some examples of comparison:

  • If a woman weighs 150 pounds and can lift 500 pounds total her Wilks score will be 230.2 but for a man who weighs 180 pounds to be around the same strength or considered slightly stronger, he would have to be able to lift 753 pounds total (230.3).
  • If a man and woman weigh exactly the same and their weight lifted is also the same, the woman will naturally have a high Wilks score due to gender difference (men are obviously biologically stronger than women on average).

Then, of course, you could compare women to women and men to men based on bodyweight/pound-for-pound difference. 

What Is Considered A Good Wilks Score?

The following estimates are based on real-world numbers.

Wilks score ranges

  • 300, then you’ve likely been lifting for at least a year. You’re not super strong yet but there’s potential.
  • 350-400 can put you in the category of national-level competitors. 
  • 450 is championship-level status. 
  • 500 and you’re in the top 10 discussion in your weight category.
  • 550 and you’re in a very small percentage of people (like one in less than 100 in the world).
  • 600 and you’re closing in on being one of the greatest to ever do it.

Marianna Gasparyan (123 class) holds the record for the highest Wilks score of all time with 720.67 and Stefi Cohen (123 class) is right behind her with 698.11 (both in wraps).

Use our calculator to determine just how strong you are when pitted up against other lifters.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How does the Wilks calculator work?

It calculates a score based on your gender, body weight, and total in the three main lifts (squat, bench and deadlift), then compares it to other lifters regardless of bodyweight or sex.

It’s basically a pound-for-pound comparison.

A few examples are…

  • If a woman weighs 150 pounds and can lift 500 pounds total her Wilks score will be 230.2 but for a man who weighs 180 pounds to be around the same strength or considered slightly stronger, he would have to be able to lift 753 pounds total (230.3).
  • If a man and woman weigh exactly the same and their weight lifted is also the same, the woman will naturally have a high Wilks score due to gender difference (men are obviously biologically stronger than women on average)

What is a good Wilks Score?

Here are some estimates based on gathered evidence and observations of the world’s top lifters so you can compare your own.

Wilks score ranges

  • 300, then you’ve likely been lifting for at least a year. You’re not super strong yet but there’s potential.
  • 350-400 can put you in the category of national-level competitors.
  • 450 is championship-level status.
  • 500 and you’re in the top 10 discussion in your weight category.
  • 550 and you’re in a very small percentage of people (like one in less than 100 in the world).
  • 600 and you’re closing in on being one of the greatest to ever do it.

Who has the highest Wilks score?

Marianna Gasparyan (123 class) holds the record for the highest Wilks score of all time with 720.67 (wraps).

Stefi Cohen (123 class) has the second-highest score with 698.11 (wraps).

Who developed the Wilks formula?

The Wilks formula is based on research and a coefficient devised by Robert Wilks, CEO of Powerlifting Australia.

The Wilks Formula

Our Wilks calculator uses the official Wilks formula, developed by Robert Wilks, to determine your Wilks score. The Wilks formula is as follows:

Wilks Formula for Men: Wilks Score = TWL * 500 / (a + b * BWT2 + c * BWT3 + d * BWT4 + e * BWT5 + f * BWT6)

Where: TWL is the total weight lifted [kg], BWT is the body weight of the lifter [kg],

a = -216.0475144, b = 16.2606339, c = -0.002388645, d = -0.00113732, e = 7.01863E-06, f = -1.291E-08.

Wilks Formula for Women: Wilks Score = TWL * 500 / (a + b * BWT2 + c * BWT3 + d * BWT4 + e * BWT5 + f * BWT6)

Where: TWL is the total weight lifted [kg], BWT is the body weight of the lifter [kg],

a = 594.31747775582, b = -27.23842536447, c = 0.82112226871, d = -0.00930733913, e = 4.731582E-05, f = -9.054E-08.

 

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